converting website visitors

ThePoultrySite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the poultry industry

Poultry News

Provita Targets Rapid Expansion in Bangladesh

11 March 2011

BANGLADESH - Provita Group has once again commissioned leading Dutch hatchery technology company Pas Reform, to fuel ambitious plans for the further expansion of its hatchery operations in Bangladesh.

In its first phase, due for completion by mid 2011, the company will install the Dutch supplier’s most advanced SmartPro™ incubation, hatchery automation and climate control systems, to expand existing hatchery operations to 50 million day old chicks per annum. The second phase, due to be operational early next year, will bring annual capacity up to 70 million.

The pioneering company first engaged Pas Reform’s Smart™ hatchery technologies in 2009. Chairman Mr Md. Nurun Nabi Bhuiyan was the driving force behind Provita’s adoption of the new technologies. He says, “Following our expansion with Smart™ incubation in 2009, we received enormously positive feedback from the marketplace on the quality of the chicks and chicken products resulting from our investment.

“Quality is at the heart of our vision – and with this proof, we have subsequently embarked on a more ambitious and large-scale plan, to meet the needs of a buoyant and growing market with reliable products of the highest quality for the future.”

Pas Reform’s agent in Bangladesh, Mr Zahidul Islam, has worked closely with Provita throughout their almost unprecedented expansion – and he is very excited about the company’s plans for the future. “Provita is at the vanguard of a technological revolution in the hatchery sector here in Bangladesh,” he says, “and Pas Reform is absolutely committed to ensuring that the SmartPro™ technologies deliver for them and for their customers, for many years to come.”

ThePoultrySite News DeskRead more PAS Reform News here




Related News


Our Sponsors

Partners


Seasonal Picks

Animal Welfare Science, Husbandry and Ethics: The Evolving Story of Our Relationship with Farm Animals