converting website visitors

ThePoultrySite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the poultry industry

Poultry News

Specific Enzyme Characteristics Key to Unlocking Potential from Xylanase

29 September 2014
AB Vista

UK - Recent developments clarifying the mechanisms by which xylanase feed enzymes produce a performance response in both corn- and wheat-based diets have highlighted the vital importance of specific enzyme characteristics, says AB Vista.

AB Vista
Dr Craig Wyatt

AB Vista Poultry Technical Manager, Dr Craig Wyatt, says: “It is widely recognised that the key to achieving a consistent, reliable response from xylanase use is to apply the correct dose of a suitably optimised xylanase, and ensure it arrives in a still-active state at the point of action. But we now have a much clearer idea about the specific characteristics needed for that xylanase to be optimised.”

This new understanding relates to the emerging importance of certain prebiotic end-products produced when a correctly targeted xylanase breaks down the arabinoxylans in plant fibre. These specific arabino-oligosaccharides (AXOS) are one of the main mechanisms by which xylanases improve nutrient digestibility and animal performance in non-viscous, corn-based diets, as well as contributing to response in viscous, wheat-based diets.

“This effect can only be achieved through use of xylanases that cleave the xylose backbone of the arabinoxylan mid-chain (endo-acting xylanases), cleave that backbone at the right point to produce the necessary prebiotic AXOS, and do not continue to break those AXOS down further,” explains Dr Wyatt.

“It is also important that the xylanase does not produce high levels of free xylose or arabinose sugars – which can be detrimental to animal performance – or possess poorly defined or undeclared side activities which may take arabinoxylan degradation too far.

“Combined with the ability to survive the acid conditions and digestive enzymes of the stomach, a high level of activity between pH 3-6 and at around 40°C (104°F), and thermostability to survive high temperature feed processing and pelleting, the result is a xylanase feed enzyme that really can be relied upon to perform consistently across all diets.”

ThePoultrySite News Desk





Related News


Our Sponsors

Partners


Seasonal Picks

Poultry Breeds and Management