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Poultry Trends in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Bolivia

17 February 2021, at 12:30am

In an interview at IPPE in January 2020, Delair Bolis, managing director for MSD Animal Health in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia, said poultry meat production had increased in 2019 in Brazil and several other Latin American countries.

Delair Bolis, managing director for MSD Animal Health in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia, speaks to The Poultry Site's Sarah Mikesell at the 2020 IPPE in Atlanta.

“In 2019, Brazil changed its government, so naturally there were high expectations for the economy and the first quarter results went very well,” said Bolis. “In the second and third quarter of 2019, the market was growing still, but at a slower rate. But the last quarter was significantly positive, not only for Brazil, but for the other countries as well, considering the numerous opportunities that we had to export meat. We exported swine and beef mostly to Asia. The trends were very positive at the end of 2019. The results closed 2019 in a very positive way from the exportation point of view.”

According to Bolis, Brazil has experienced significant growth in the poultry industry. They have improved in not only production but also productivity. The country has become well known as a great reference on technology, innovation and disease control.

Brazil has also been able to keep important diseases out of the country, keeping poultry conditions sanitary. This has made Brazil maintain its spot as a competitor in the international market. Brazil also remains competitive with its exchange rate, which has become an advantage when facing international markets.

Biosecurity remains top concern

With disease prominent all over the world, biosecurity continues to be a concern for many producers. Brazil has taken many steps to ensure they heighten biosecurity measures. It’s evident right now to many that Brazil is a safe country from a biosecurity point of view, performing even better than the United States, according to Bolis. Visitors are required to stay out of poultry farms for a certain period of time to ensure the health and safety of the farm. Those attending shows respects that rule, knowing that biosecurity is an important advantage for the industry, he noted.

“There is a huge contingency of people from South America at the poultry show,” said Bolis. “Not only from Brazil, but also Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia and Mexico. I saw, for example, some flight companies adding extra flights just to accommodate it. It's very nice to see. When I was doing my check in in Brazil, the flight attendant from the company said, 'Are you also going to the poultry show?' So everyone was aware of it. It's very good.”

Bolis said Latin American visitors show up not only to attend but also to expose the show information to others.

"The sharing of knowledge from these shows can be beneficial for poultry producers all over the world," he said.