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International Egg and Poultry Review: US

by 5m Editor
2 February 2011, at 9:15am

US - This is a weekly report by the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry. This week's review looks at US turkey imports.

January-November 2010 total cumulative turkey meat imports are 18 per cent higher than 2009, 168 per cent higher than 2005 and 2,136 per cent higher than 2000. Total January-November cumulative turkey meats in 2010 were 10,499.8 metric tons, 2005 3,913.7 metric tons and 2000 469.6 metric tons.

Approximately 72 per cent of total cumulative turkey meat imports for January-November 2010 were frozen turkey cuts with fresh/chilled turkeys cuts a distant second. Minor amounts of fresh and frozen whole turkeys were also imported.

Canada continues to be the dominant source of all the United States turkey meat import categories. However, for the January-November 2010 time frame, total cumulative frozen turkey part imports from Chile were 1,260 metric tons, or 21 per cent of total frozen cut imports and 12 per cent of overall 2010 January-November cumulative turkey meat imports. This compares to no turkey meat imports being recorded from Chile from 2007 and earlier. Israel is distant third exporter to the US exporting 224 metric tons.

January-November, 2010 cumulative prepared turkey meat imports are eight per cent higher than 2009, but only 23 per cent of the 10-year high of 4,558 metric tons reached 2007. Prominent exporters to the US, by order of rank, include Mexico, Israel and Canada.

Canada continues to be the dominant source of live turkey poult imports with the United Kingdom a very distant second. Overall, January-November 2010 cumulative turkey poult imports are 13 per cent higher than the same period of 2009 but 39 per cent lower than the 10-year high in 2004 for the same time-frame.
Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service









Further Reading

- You can view the full report by clicking here.