China vows to improve hygiene in food markets after surge in coronavirus cases

Following a new COVID-19 outbreak, members of China’s Communist Party say that low standards of hygiene in China’s wholesale food markets and supply chain vulnerabilities need to be urgently addressed.
calendar icon 18 June 2020
clock icon 5 minute read

China's sprawling food markets have emerged as an ideal breeding ground for the coronavirus, which has now infected more than 8 million people worldwide. The first major cluster of infections was traced to the Huanan seafood market in Wuhan, where bats and other wild animals were believed to be on sale.

The CCDI report noted that most of the markets were built 20 to 30 years ago, when drainage and wastewater treatment was relatively undeveloped.

An Yufa, a professor at China Agricultural University, was cited in the report as saying the markets must follow international practice and implement origin tracing systems as well as documentation on storage, transport and sale.

Officials in Wuhan province took 3,000 samples from tools, chopping boards and drains in 114 farmers' markets and 107 supermarkets this week to check for potential new sources of infection. All came up negative, they said.

China has promised to ban the trade and consumption and wildlife in a bid to minimise disease transmission, though the use of wild animal products in traditional medicine will still be permitted.

Read more about this story here.

China's sprawling food markets have emerged as an ideal breeding ground for the coronavirus, which has now infected more than 8 million people worldwide. The first major cluster of infections was traced to the Huanan seafood market in Wuhan, where bats and other wild animals were believed to be on sale.

The CCDI report noted that most of the markets were built 20 to 30 years ago, when drainage and wastewater treatment was relatively undeveloped.

An Yufa, a professor at China Agricultural University, was cited in the report as saying the markets must follow international practice and implement origin tracing systems as well as documentation on storage, transport and sale.

Officials in Wuhan province took 3,000 samples from tools, chopping boards and drains in 114 farmers' markets and 107 supermarkets this week to check for potential new sources of infection. All came up negative, they said.

China has promised to ban the trade and consumption and wildlife in a bid to minimise disease transmission, though the use of wild animal products in traditional medicine will still be permitted.

Read more about this story here.

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