Chinese shoppers avoid frozen food imports after COVID-19 detection

Chinese shoppers have expressed dismay at reports of traces of the coronavirus being found in frozen food imports, with some saying they will avoid the products.
calendar icon 17 August 2020
clock icon 5 minute read

Fears of the risks from imported frozen food first arose when the virus was found on a chopping board in Beijing's Xinfadi wholesale market in June. The vendor had used the board to handle imported salmon.

Austin Hu, the chef at high-end Shanghai restaurant Heritage by Madison, said they experienced delays in receiving live seafood like oysters after the incident as authorities stepped up checks, adding that consumer confidence had been affected.

"It has been more difficult, I mean especially seafood we are talking about, since the incidents with shrimps and incidents with salmon," he said.

When asked about imports from Brazil on Friday, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said authorities were engaging with the relevant country and did not comment on whether imports would be restricted.

Still, other shoppers said that they were placing their trust in the authorities and in food sellers.

"We need to be careful, but I think the food should be safe if they put it out," said a man who only gave his surname as Lei. "If they are selling it, then it should not have problems."

Read more about this story here.

Fears of the risks from imported frozen food first arose when the virus was found on a chopping board in Beijing's Xinfadi wholesale market in June. The vendor had used the board to handle imported salmon.

Austin Hu, the chef at high-end Shanghai restaurant Heritage by Madison, said they experienced delays in receiving live seafood like oysters after the incident as authorities stepped up checks, adding that consumer confidence had been affected.

"It has been more difficult, I mean especially seafood we are talking about, since the incidents with shrimps and incidents with salmon," he said.

When asked about imports from Brazil on Friday, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said authorities were engaging with the relevant country and did not comment on whether imports would be restricted.

Still, other shoppers said that they were placing their trust in the authorities and in food sellers.

"We need to be careful, but I think the food should be safe if they put it out," said a man who only gave his surname as Lei. "If they are selling it, then it should not have problems."

Read more about this story here.

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