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Increased number of emerging black poultry farmers

South African Poultry Association creating a more representative poultry industry

19 November 2021, at 1:03am

The South African Poultry Association (SAPA) has been in the process of creating a more representative poultry industry for the last five years.

Aziz Sulliman, Chairperson of the South African Poultry Association
Aziz Sulliman, Chairperson of the South African Poultry Association

Coupled with the guidelines of the poultry sector master plan, the Association has made some tremendous strides on this journey and is considered the most transformed organisation when compared to all the other producers. This transformation is reflected in its board, its membership and its operations.

Among its members, emerging black contract growers are farming 12.6 million birds at the moment, and this will increase to 16 million birds over the course of the next 12 months. In the last two years alone, black farmers have built 79 poultry houses to the value of R355m, while the industry invested a further R1.14 billion to create markets for these additional chickens.

By way of example, SAPA’s first black hatchery owner has expanded from hatching 7 000 birds per week to now doing 28 000 birds per week, and by the end of the year they will achieve 50 000 chicks per week to supply the independent market. This is massive for emerging farmers, and for South Africa.

Willie Bosoga, Chairperson of the Association’s Egg board and Transformation Committee
Willie Bosoga, Chairperson of the Association’s Egg board and Transformation Committee

Beyond the material investment, the Poultry Association has supported more than 40 independent producers with business plans, environmental impact analyses and water licences to enable them to farm, including an additional 40 farmers being assisted with various aspects of their operations. Almost 2000 emerging farmers were trained in the various aspects of their farming operations, while an additional 1 460 farmers are receiving remote assistance.

Despite this, the industry’s progress continues to be attacked by the African Farmers Association of South Africa, and chicken importer Unati Spiers of the Emerging Black Importers and Exporters (Ebiesa). These organisations continue to snipe at SAPA and the master plan, which has the support of the poultry industry, the public and the government. These organisations do not speak for us, nor our emerging black farmers, or the poultry sector. SAPA will continue this drive to bring more emerging farmers into the fold, developing their talent and capabilities, and aiding them in increasing operational efficiencies; it’s good for the industry, and it’s great for South Africa.

* Sulliman is the Chairperson of the South African Poultry Association and Bosoga is the Chairperson of the Association’s Egg board and Transformation Committee.